Singapore will soon be implementing the 1996 Protocol to the Convention on Limitation of Liability for Maritime Claims of 1976 (as amended in 2012 and effective from 2015), following the passing of the Merchant Shipping (Miscellaneous Amendments) Bill.

With the passing of the Bill, Singapore’s limitation of liability regime for maritime claims will be aligned

The Merchant Shipping (Miscellaneous Amendments) Bill was read in the Singapore Parliament for the first time on 19 November 2018.

The Bill proposes to make a number of significant amendments to Singapore’s merchant shipping legislation. These include:

  1. enacting the International Convention on Salvage 1989 as part of Singapore law; and
  2. adopting the 1996 Protocol to amend the Convention on Limitation of Liability for Maritime Claims, 1976.

The Bill is expected to be debated in parliament over the coming weeks. A further update will follow if the Bill is passed.Continue Reading Significant amendments in the pipeline to Singapore’s Merchant Shipping Act

In a survey conducted by Reed Smith in the first half of 2018, industry participants predicted that big data analytics will be one of the most significant drivers of change in the shipping industry over the next five years. In addition, for the same five-year period, the survey revealed that the shipping industry considers the development of automated processes and functions on board vessels to be the biggest driver of efficiency in shipping.

The collection, analysis and management of huge volumes of unstructured data (i.e., big data), such as data on voyage performance, ship structure, machinery, fuel consumption, traffic, cargo and the weather, are expected to provide valuable insights into the operation of ships, and uncover hidden patterns as well as market trends. The analysis of big data will also allow the prediction of likely outcomes in certain voyages. In addition, it is likely to reduce costs, as the industry will be able to identify more efficient ways of doing business; it will allow decisions to be made more quickly; and it will make shipping safer by reducing risks.
Continue Reading Big data analytics and autonomous vessels – when will legislation catch up?

The British Chamber of Shipping has published guidelines to the UK Bribery Act 2010 (the “Act”), which came into force on 1 July 2011. The purpose of the guidelines is stated as being “to provide general background and highlight points to be taken into account when considering issues raised by the Bribery Act”.

The guidance